Can A Neighbour Attach A Gate Or Post To My House, Garage, Wall Or Fence?

A neighbour can only screw into your wall, house or garage if you give them permission when installing a gate!

Fixing to a neighbours wall
Fixing to a neighbours wall

If the wall is a party wall and owned by both sides then a neighbour can screw fixings into the wall.

Using your neighbours:

  • Garden wall
  • House wall
  • wooden Fence
  • Garage wall

Without permission then you are breaking the law and could face prosecution.

If your neighbour has used fixings to hang a gate on your property for access to their garden then you have every right to have it removed.

What Can You Do?

If you have discovered someone has drilled into your house wall, fence or garage wall to fit a gate then they have broken the law.

By law, they must remove this and repair any damage caused. If they will not remove the gate then you can:

  • Inform the local planning officer
  • Contact a solicitor and file for compensation
  • Speak with the neighbours and tell them it needs to be removed

Sometimes a headed letter from a solicitor works wonders. It will make them realize they have done something illegal and might change their minds.

Failing that a planning officer from the council will investigate and the matter will go to the small claims court for compensation and an order to remove the gate and repair the bricks that have been drilled.

Is There A Workaround?

Yes, if you want to install a gate to access your garden you MUST seek permission.

If permission is denied by your neighbour to screw and hang a gate, there is another option.

You must concrete your own post into the ground and use this to hang your gate.

It’s a very simple job but you must make sure you plum the post in straight or the gate will not fit well.

Neighbour Disputes - Law and Practises
Neighbour Disputes – Law and Practises

Installing Your Stand Alone Fence Post

As long as the area you are digging is on your property you are well within your rights to concrete your post into the ground.

This will be a free-standing post not connected to your neighbour’s garage wall, house wall, fence or shed.

Dig a hole around 2 feet deep, position your post and fill with concrete. Use a level and make sure the post is straight before the concrete sets.

Once the concrete has set you will have your own free-standing post to hang your new gate!

10 thoughts on “Can A Neighbour Attach A Gate Or Post To My House, Garage, Wall Or Fence?”

  1. Hi there, I am looking to install a new garden fence were currently we just have a wire fence in place. To do this, I am going to install some concrete posts to support the fence. This will involve replacing part a wall where my neighbours patio area is built upon and also to attach a post their garage at the end of the garden.
    What permissions do I need to get from the neighbours to do this?

    Reply
  2. My neighbour has a wall cemented onto my detached house – trouble is, it was already there when we both moved in years ago. Have we the right to make him take it off and do his own “free standing” post for his wall.

    Reply
    • Hey Sue,

      You can ask them to move it, that is your decision. If they do build a free-standing post then they will have to dig down 2 feet for the concrete support to hold. This might cause you issues concerning your foundations.

      Make sure you bring this to their attention and advise them to be careful

      Hope this helps

      Reply
  3. I built on top of my garage with full planning permission years ago. My neighbours built a wood frame construction with retrospective planning and asked to join their roof to my wall. I agreed verbally as I thought it would stop debris falling between the gap from their extension and mine. They basically put a wooden frame on top of their garage and joined the roof to the two houses using our extension wall as their inside wall. I now plan to sell and realise they have made us a mid link instead of a semi. Can I do anything?

    Reply
    • Hey Lisa,

      If you did not contest the planning permission then there is nothing that can be done. Unless it causing damage to your property. Maybe check with the planning and ask to speak with the building inspecting department.

      Kindest

      Reply
  4. Hi. Our driveway is a sloped drive which our neighbours house is to the left of. The brickwork to their home is over 200 years old and really shoddy looking but it’s only us that see it as its on our side of the house and they have no access to it. We want to try and neaten it up by adding some cedar cladding but not sure where we stand about screwing some batons to their house to add some paneling to. Any thoughts?

    Reply
  5. Our neighbour has attached a fence to our house wall without our permission. We now realise he did this sometime ago. We saw a fence panel appear behind 3 leylandii that were way too tall. We assumed he had fixed in some way to his own side of the boundary as we have a right of way path in his garden due to being a bungalow with wide soffits. This came to light after he recently sold his house. Can we ask the new owners to remove the fixings? Clearly there will be damage to the wall, but we would like the access restoring as it should be and has been since we bought the house 30 years ago.
    .

    Reply
  6. My neighbour has fixed a pony sized kennel and run to my houses outside wall. I asked them 3 weeks before I needed access fir wall insulation then 3 days before but they had fixed it on the wall. 4 men turned up to do the wall insulation and nothing was moved. They went away. Now my neighbours are not responding and I need access to my outside wall for maintenance. What should I do next? The property is rented and they have refused to tell me who the landlord is.

    Reply
  7. Hi, my neighbour gave me oral permission to attach my fence to his fenceskfront and back) last year, he has now taking away a bit of wood which helped lock my gate into place and unattached my fence from the other side. What I can do about this? #

    Reply

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